Entomophagy Recipes: Chocolate Mealworm Clusters

Posted:
Sept. 8, 2019


May contain affiliate links.

People will have to look at these closely to realize they are not traditional chocolate turtles or pecan cluster, but actually mealworm clusters! This recipe was inspired by Schoko-Wurmhäufchen by Snack Insects, out of Germany.

Chocolate Mealworm Clusters


Total: 30 mins; Serves 12

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup milk chocolate chips or other meltable chocolate
  • 1/2 cup roasted or dehydrated mealworms (unflavored)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. If you are using ready-to-eat mealworms, skip to step 3; all you have to do is open the bag. If you are using frozen mealworms, follow provider instructions on the package. If you have raised your own mealworms, you will need to euthanize them in the freezer a day ahead of time, then boil for 3-5 minutes to kill any parasites, and drain. The easiest way to boil something tiny, like mealworms, is to bring water in a small pot to a rolling boil, then place mealworms in a fine mesh stainless steel strainer, and lower into boiling water for 3-5 minutes. Then, all you need to do it lift the strainer out of the boiling water, and rinse the mealworms, still in the strainer, with cool water.

2. To roast, preheat oven to 320°F/160°C, and spread mealworms over a pan or piece of tin foil. You don't need any oil, they are fatty enough. Roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes until they are fragrant, and lightly crispy and dry to the touch. Be sure to watch carefully, as they can burn very quickly! Set mealworms aside.

3. Melt chocolate according to instructions on the package. Most likely it will involve watching and stirring constantly over a stove, or in a microwave, removing frequently to stir.

4. While chocolate is still quite warm, add mealworms to chocolate, and stir until mealworms are fully coated. Use a spoon to make small scoops, and drop rough, rounded chocolate mealworms balls onto wax paper. Allow to cool in the refrigerator for 1 hour, then separate from the wax paper and store in an airtight container.


This entomophagy recipe is included in Bugs for Beginners, a cookbook which teaches Westerners how to prepare edible insects and safely eat a bug. Text may include affiliate links

Meet Mic

I'm Mic. I love reading about, writing about, thinking about, photographing, and especially eating, food. Especially bug food. Enough talk, let's eat!

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